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We Make "U" Smile & the World Smiles with "U"
 
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
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Children begin to get their baby teeth during the first 6 months of life. By age 6 or 7 years, they start to lose their first set of teeth, which eventually are replaced by secondary, permanent teeth. Without proper dental care, children face possible oral decay and disease that can cause a lifetime of pain and complications. Today, early childhood dental caries—an infectious disease—is 5 times more common in children than asthma.

Preserve the Milk Teeth:

Even though deciduous teeth or milk teeth eventually fall to give way to the permanent teeth, they have a certain life period during which they are needed in the mouth for the following reasons:

  • Maintain the space for the permanent teeth
  • To keep the mouth healthy and free of infections
  • For enabling the child to eat and chew
  • For clarity of speech
  • For aesthetic reasons

In severe cases, the tooth may need to be removed, and a space maintainer installed to fill the gap. But many times, space maintainers don't fully restore the tooth's functionality. Plus, they are susceptible to coming loose and must be monitored constantly. If possible, other treatment methods are preferred, such as:

Indirect pulp treatment
If pulp damage is minimal, it's possible to remove most of the decay (but not the pulp), apply an antibiotic, and then seal the tooth up again; that's referred to as an “indirect” treatment.

Pulpotomy
Alternatively, if decay is limited to the upper portion of the pulp, we may recommend a “pulpotomy.” This involves removing the damaged part of the pulp, stabilizing the remaining healthy portion, and then disinfecting and sealing the tooth. This “partial” root canal is a time-tested technique that's successful in many cases.

Pulpectomy
If pulp tissue is infected through the entire tooth structure, a pulpectomy may be needed, which requires the removal of all pulp tissue. The canals are then disinfected, shaped, then filled and sealed with inert material. Afterwards, the crown (visible part) of the tooth will be restored. This resembles traditional root canal therapy, with a crucial difference: The sealant we use in children is capable of being dissolved by the body. That way, when it's time for a permanent tooth to erupt, the baby tooth's roots can be naturally absorbed and tooth development can proceed normally.

Pit and Fissure Sealants

Sealants are a safe and painless way or protecting your teeth from decay. A sealant is a protective plastic coating, which is applied to the biting surfaces of the back teeth. The sealant forms a hard shield that keeps food and bacteria from getting into the tiny grooves in the teeth and causing decay.

Sealants are often applied as soon as the permanent teeth start to come through. This is usually between 6 and 7 years of age. The rest are usually sealed as soon as they appear which can be any time between 11 and 14 years of age.

Fluoride Treatment
It helps teeth resist decay. If the dentist thinks extra fluoride would be useful, they may recommend applying a fluoride varnish. They may also suggest fluoride rinses, tablets or drops to use at home as an extra help against decay. Children up to three years old should use a toothpaste with a fluoride level of at least 1000ppm (parts per million). Three-year-olds to adults should use toothpaste that contains 1350ppm to 1500ppm of fluoride.