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We Make "U" Smile & the World Smiles with "U"
 
Endodontic/ Root Canal Treatment
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Treatment Options for the Diseased Tooth

Root Canals

Inside the tooth, under the white enamel and a hard layer called the dentin, is a soft tissue called the pulp. The pulp contains blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue, and helps to grow the root of your tooth during development. In a fully developed tooth, the tooth can survive without the pulp because the tooth continues to be nourished by the tissues surrounding it.

Endodontic treatment treats the inside of the tooth. Endodontic treatment is necessary when the pulp becomes inflamed or infected. The inflammation or infection can have a variety of causes: deep decay, repeated dental procedures on the tooth, faulty crowns, or a crack or chip in the tooth. In addition, trauma to a tooth may cause pulp damage even if the tooth has no visible chips or cracks. If pulp inflammation or infection is left untreated, it can cause pain or lead to an abscess.   

During root canal treatment, the inflamed or infected pulp is removed and the inside of the tooth is carefully cleaned and disinfected, then filled and sealed with a rubber-like material called gutta-percha. Afterwards, the tooth is restored with a crown or filling for protection. After restoration, the tooth continues to function like any other tooth.

Contrary to jokes about the matter, modern root canal treatment is very similar to having a routine filling and usually can be completed in one or two appointments, depending on the condition of your tooth and your personal circumstances. You can expect a comfortable experience during and after your appointment.

Saving the natural tooth with root canal treatment has many advantages:

  • Efficient chewing
  • Normal biting force and sensation
  • Natural appearance
  • Protects other teeth from excessive wear or strain

Endodontic treatment helps you maintain your natural smile, continue eating the foods you love and limit the need for ongoing dental work. With proper care, most teeth that have had root canal treatment can last as long as other natural teeth and often for a lifetime.  

Myths about Root Canals and Root Canal Pain

There are many misconceptions surrounding root canal (endodontic) treatment-

Myth #1—Root canal treatment is painful.
Truth—Root canal treatment doesn't cause pain, it relieves it.

Myth #2—Root canal treatment causes illness.
The truth: There is no valid, scientific evidence linking root canal-treated teeth and disease elsewhere in the body. 

Myth #3—Good alternative to root canal treatment is extraction (pulling the tooth).
Truth—Saving your natural teeth, if possible, is the very best option.

Painless Single Sitting Endodontics/Root Canal Treatment:

Root canal treatment has become faster and painless in the last two decades. Credit goes to the advanced technologies and better materials used today. Single Sitting Root Canal Treatment is very common especially when patient doesn’t have infection around the tooth.
There are lots of advantages of Single Sitting Root Canal Treatment:

  • Beneficial in cases where patients don't show up to complete the RCT.
  • Saves time for patient and dentist.
  • Patients comfort as the procedure is completed in a single appointment, reducing the number of visits.
  • Patient doesn't have to experience the discomfort caused by local anesthesia again & again.
  • Chances of bacterial recontamination are reduced by virtue of number of visits.
Traumatic Dental Injuries

Traumatic dental injuries often occur in accidents or sports-related injuries. Chipped teeth account for the majority of all dental injuries. Dislodged or knocked-out teeth are examples of less frequent, but more severe injuries. Treatment depends on the type, location and severity of each injury. Any dental injury, even if apparently mild, requires examination by a dentist. Sometimes, neighboring teeth suffer an additional, unnoticed injury that will only be detected by a thorough dental exam.

Root Fractures

A traumatic injury to the tooth may also result in a horizontal root fracture. The location of the fracture determines the long-term health of the tooth. If the fracture is close to the root tip, the chances for success are much better. However, the closer the fracture is to the gum line, the poorer the long-term success rate. Sometimes, stabilization with a splint is required for a period of time.

Do traumatic dental injuries differ in children?

Chipped primary (baby) teeth can be esthetically restored. Dislodged primary teeth can, in rare cases, be repositioned. However, primary teeth that have been knocked out typically should not be replanted. This is because the replantation of a knocked-out primary tooth may cause further and permanent damage to the underlying permanent tooth that is growing inside the bone.