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We Make "U" Smile & the World Smiles with "U"
 
SURGICAL DENTISTRY
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The word “surgery” often brings to mind a stay in the hospital, general anesthesia, and perhaps a lengthy recovery period. However, the experience of having oral surgery is usually very different from that. Oral surgery is often performed in a dental office setting, under local anesthesia, with minimal recovery time. Oral Surgery can range from routine procedures such as tooth extractions and implant placement to more complex jaw realignment surgeries and emergency care for facial trauma.

Tooth Extractions-
There are a variety of reasons why you may need a tooth or teeth removed. You may have a wisdom tooth that is impacted; a diseased tooth that can't be saved; or overcrowded teeth that need to be removed so more room can be created to facilitate proper alignment during orthodontics.

Dental Implants
Today's preferred method of tooth replacement is a titanium dental implant, which is placed beneath the gum line and into the jawbone during a minor surgical procedure. The implant is then attached to a realistic-looking dental crown that is visible above the gum line and indistinguishable from a natural tooth.

Oral Diagnosis & Biopsies
When a suspicious oral lesion is found, a biopsy is often used to detect or rule out oral cancer — a disease that is treatable if caught early. A biopsy involves removing a very small tissue sample for laboratory analysis.

Corrective Jaw Surgery
Sometimes a person's jaws don't fit together properly. This can affect both jaw function and appearance.

TMD
When conservative remedies fail to relieve chronic jaw pain over a long period of time, surgery may be considered.

Facial Trauma & Reconstructive Surgery
Facial injuries can affect not only a person's ability to carry on basic life functions such as eating, but also his or her appearance. Knocked-out teeth can sometimes be re-implanted, or replaced with dental implants.

Cleft Lip/Palate
With proper surgical treatment, the child has an excellent chance of leading a healthy, normal life.

REMOVAL OF IMPACTED TEETH
Wisdom teeth, also referred to as the "third molars", are as important as other teeth, but more prone to problems during their eruption (breaking through the gum tissue). Since wisdom teeth are the last to erupt — usually between the ages of 17 and 21 — there often is little room left in the mouth.

As a result, wisdom teeth may erupt sideways, only partially, or become trapped (impacted), leading to pain, infection, and gum line and facial swelling. When any of these conditions arise, your dentist may determine that wisdom tooth extraction is necessary.

Wisdom Teeth Removal
Wisdom teeth removal is a fairly common oral surgery. However, the removal of wisdom teeth prior to eruption involves a surgical procedure that is far from a simple tooth extraction.
The risks involved with extracting a wisdom tooth include, but are not limited to:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Swelling
  • Persistent sinus opening
  • Lower lip numbness

Dentists are keenly aware of the disadvantages of keeping wisdom teeth, some of which include the potential shifting of surrounding teeth, jaw pain and interruptions with normal sinus functionality. Yet, the decision to extract is your dentist's.

Wisdom Tooth Extraction Recovery

Wisdom tooth extraction recovery takes approximately five to seven days, with the gum area being fully healed in approximately three to four weeks. If the jaw is damaged during tooth extraction, full recovery may take up to six months.
Once you have undergone the surgical extraction procedure, there are several steps to take to ensure proper healing and recovery from the procedure.

During the first 24 hours after wisdom teeth removal, you can expect some bleeding. To control bleeding, a moist, clean piece of gauze can be placed over the extraction site. Biting pressure applied for 45 minutes should stop the bleeding.

Stitches may be used during your procedure if the wisdom tooth is impacted and must be removed from under the surface of the gum line. If the stitches are not self-dissolving, they will need to be removed postoperatively. Your dental surgeon will discuss with you whether or not you need to return to the dental office to have them removed.

Facial swelling also is expected after wisdom tooth extraction. To relieve swelling, wrap ice in a cloth and apply it to the swollen facial area. Ice should be applied for 10 minutes and removed for 20 minutes, then repeated. This cycle can be repeated as often as necessary during the first 24 hours following wisdom teeth removal.

For pain and discomfort caused by the extraction, your dental surgeon may prescribe prescription pain relievers, if necessary. Antibiotics also may be prescribed prior to the procedure to clear any infections of the tissue surrounding the wisdom teeth. After extraction, it is important to continue taking the medication to prevent any further or additional infection.

Wisdom Tooth Extraction Aftercare

  • Do not rinse your mouth for the first 24 hours immediately following a tooth extraction.
  • Stick to a soft or liquid diet (milk, ice cream, khichdi, curd rice) the day of and the day after a tooth extraction, gradually progressing to eating other easy-to-chew foods. Chew with teeth that are far from the extraction site.
  • Brush and floss the other teeth as usual, but avoid the teeth and gum next to the extraction socket.
  • After the first 24 hours, gently rinse the socket with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a cup of water) after meals and before bed. Repeat this process for at least five days following extraction.
PERIODONTAL TREATMENT AND GUM SURGERIES

Periodontitis is a serious gum infection that destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Periodontitis can cause tooth loss or worse, an increased risk of heart attack or stroke and other serious health problems.
Periodontitis is common but largely preventable. Periodontitis is usually the result of poor oral hygiene. Daily brushing and flossing and regular professional dental cleanings can greatly reduce your chance of developing periodontitis.

Various periodontal problems

Gingivitis
The longer plaque and tartar are on teeth, the more harmful they become. The bacteria cause inflammation of the gums that is called "gingivitis."  In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. 

Periodontitis
When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to "periodontitis" (which means "inflammation around the tooth.")  In periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces (called "pockets") that become infected. 

Risk Factors

  • Heredity
  • Poor oral health habits
  • Tobacco use
  • Diabetes
  • Older age
  • Decreased immunity, such as that occurring with leukemia or HIV/AIDS or chemotherapy
  • Poor nutrition
  • Certain medications like Nifedipine, Cyclosporine , Phenytoin, etc.
  • Hormonal changes, such as those related to pregnancy or menopause
  • Substance abuse
  • Ill-fitting dental restorations

Types of Periodontal treatments available

Nonsurgical treatments
If your periodontitis isn't advanced, treatment can include less invasive procedures, including:

  • Scaling. Scaling removes tartar and bacteria from your tooth surfaces and beneath your gums. It may be performed using instruments or an ultrasonic device.
  • Root planing. Root planing smoothes the root surfaces, discouraging further buildup of tartar.
  • Antibiotics. The use of antibiotics to treat periodontitis remains open to debate. Your periodontist or dentist may recommend using topical or oral antibiotics to help control bacterial infection. Topical antibiotics are generally the treatment of choice. They can include antibiotic mouth rinses or insertion of threads and gels containing antibiotics in the space between your teeth and gums or into pockets after deep cleaning. However, oral antibiotics may be necessary to completely eliminate infection-causing bacteria.

Surgical treatments
If you have advanced periodontitis, your gum tissue may not respond to nonsurgical treatments and good oral hygiene. In that case, your periodontitis treatment may require dental surgery, such as:

  • Flap surgery (pocket reduction surgery). In this procedure, your periodontist makes tiny incisions in your gum so that a section of gum tissue can be lifted back, exposing the roots for more effective scaling and planing. Because periodontitis often causes bone loss, the underlying bone may be recontoured before the gum tissue is sutured back in place. The procedure generally takes from one to three hours and is performed under local anesthesia.

Other surgical procedures like- Soft tissue grafts, Bone grafting, Guided tissue regeneration, Enamel matrix derivative application.

Prevention
The best way to prevent any Gum disease is to follow a program of good oral hygiene, one that you begin early and practice consistently throughout life. That means brushing your teeth at least twice daily — in the morning and before going to bed — and flossing at least once a day. Better yet, brush after every meal or snack or as your dentist recommends. A complete cleaning with a toothbrush and floss should take three to five minutes. Flossing before you brush allows you to clean away the loosened food particles and bacteria.

Also, see your dentist or dental hygienist regularly for cleanings, usually every six to 12 months. If you have risk factors that increase your chance of developing gum disease, you may need professional tooth cleaning more often.